Collection: Part 3

Research

Katy Dove

Katy Dove's Lunar is one of the artworks that I have rewatched many times but can still watch it again with the same level, and if not more interest and admiration. On the surface, her animation looks very minimalistic and simple, however it has been composed in a way that is more complex than just any shape and colour. The ambience created by the background music composition also added in the mesmerising effect it gives the viewers. Although it seemed like the animation itself was created with a very simple method, with 2d objects being moved around and not altered in other ways, there seem to be a very fluid flow in the way she makes the objects come to life.

The background of the animation is also something that caught my eye. It seemed to be a very soft and pastel mixture of colours, creating a dream like effect.

My visit to White Cube, Pier Paolo Calzolari

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My visit to White Cube, Pier Paolo Calzolari

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Wassily Kandinsky

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Wassily Kandinsky

His works aimed to connect with human emotion through a form of language that everyone can be able to understand on a deeper level, without the social boundaries such as culture differences, language barriers etc. I find that although abstracts should be something that is like Kandinsky stated; universal, but in the present day, I still feel like there is a barrier for some people who may not appreciate some forms of art such as abstract art. I agree with how everyone could appreciate the colour relationships and familiar forms that have been pulled forward by abstract paintings, and personally I can connect with abstract art, but as an observation I still find some people who do not "like" abstract art and I thought that it was an interesting point to mention.

That lead me to think about my own project, as it is about something personal, but everyone has experienced it in different forms, which is childhood and upbringing. Will people be able to connect with my work like I have intended them to? Does it really matter? Those are questions that I asked myself, but for now, I think that my aims are to deliver what I really want to deliver, with the hope of people being able to connect with it but if they do not, at least provoke something in them and promote some kind of interesting.

I found it interesting how Kandinsky viewed painting as something spiritual. I agree with this statement, even though I do not really know the extent to which I would call my connection to the painting spiritual, but I feel like there is something to be said about that. It is hard to describe, but because I have just "started" to practice abstract painting during this foundation course ( as opposed to realism) I feel like there is a completely different energy to the work and from me. Abstract painting to me is something that is very personal, and also very situational. I think that my works would have turned out to be different if my head was at a different place on the days I paint, and everything is fresh and unpredictable.

 

My visit to PACE gallery

This exhibition featured many forms of art including sculptures, glass drip works, installations and even two chandeliers. I think that this is the first exhibition that I have been to that had chandeliers. Usually the lighting in the exhibition space would be plain and sort of hidden, showcasing just the "artwork" within the exhibition. However, in Fred Wilson's Afro Kismet, the chandeliers themselves are part of the exhibition which I thought was very interesting. This made me feel like the exhibition formed a room and made the space seem more personal and homely. By adding the chandeliers I felt like this connected the other pieces together and it seemed more like an exhibition where everything in it was related and created one story to tell.

Fredrik Akum

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Samuel Johnson By James Barry

This piece was also one of my favourites in the National Portrait gallery. I thought that for a painting that dated back so long ago, (1778-1780), this somehow seemed very contemporary and modern in my opinion. I love the colours that are used. Although they must have been the undertones and basic colours that are used to build up to paint the human face and body, I found the toned down, warm colours were complimenting each other very well. The piece was described as unfinished, and it was actually painting during the last few years of Samuel Johnson's life, yet the image that is being painted reflected him from when he was at a peak of his life, regarding wealth and fame. What I find more interesting in the works itself of portraits are the reason behind them, and if they underlay any messages other than drawing for a person.

This piece actually reminded me of a much more contemporary artist, Jarek Puczel, whom I love the works of. Although the paint style is different, (ofcourse), I liked how they crossed over in the parts with less detail and more of just roughly painted colours. I found this trip to the National Portrait Gallery amazing, not only because of the works there but I am very enlightened by how a very dated and "traditional" painting reminded me of an artist that I know but haven't thought of in this project, and now I am going to incorporate because I have been reminded of.

My Visit to the National Portrait Gallery

I came to visit the National Portrait Gallery for the first time because I wanted to go to see the Tacit Dean exhibition. However I thought that it was really odd if I only went there to see her exhibition because her works could be seen as "different" from what is usually in the gallery. I was excited to see all the historical works and I personally love museums and galleries in the first place, so going to any would be very interesting for me. However to be very honest, I am not the biggest fan of portraits. It is just something that I don't really relate with and although I must admit that they are beautiful and the painters are very skilled, they just seem artificial and unrealistic to me.

However, I went to the galleries with an open mind and to my surprise I actually really liked some of the works in the gallery. Especially seeing the very large ones that spanned across the walls, it just overwhelmed me in a positive way and I was pleasantly surprised. On the other hand, I have found artist's works that actually caught my attention and If I were to describe the kind of works that caught my eye, it would be the ones that were described as a work in progress, or unfinished. I just found that this just made the work so much more relatable and humanly.

For example, this portrait of Spencer Gore by Harold Gilman. If I remember correctly it was described as a work in progress and in my opinion I really enjoyed looking at the raw and rough brushstrokes, and I loved seeing how the colours compliment each other in a painting. Also I am interested as to why the work was remained as a "work in progress" and why the artist decided not to finish it. Is it because they did not like how it turned out so far, had other reasons or are they actually pleased with how it looks as of now.

Bridget Riley

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Bridget Riley- My visit to the Tate Modern

Bridget Riley's works caught my eye quite literally, as her works produces some kind of optical illusion when you look at it. The colours, the shapes, and the composition she uses works together in harmony to create this optical illusion that is confusing, yet beautiful to look at. I really like works that seem to create a bridge between the digital and the traditional (painted). In Riley's case, she creates something that looks computer generated herself, using paint. I am amazed by how precise her works are, and although they may seem simple, because they are "just" blocks of colour, she managed to lay them out in such a complimentary composition that elevates her work to another level. I am personally a person who really appreciates simple and minimal work that is done with great precision and thought put in to it.

Tacita Dean: Portrait, My visit to the National Portrait Gallery

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hach winik by Miquel Dewever-Plana

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Miho Kajioka: Unfinished Spaces

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Miho Kajioka: Unfinished Spaces

I came across her works by chance when I went to the Photographer's Gallery where her works are in the area that are purchasable. Miho Kajioka is a fine art photographer, and her works sprung from when she was reporting as a journalist at Kamaishi city when it was struck by the tsunami and earthquake in 2011. She was inspired by when she saw roses blooming next to a destructed building. I could only imagine the beautiful contrast between something so graceful being juxtaposed alongside something devastated by the hands of destruction, and when she saw this she knew it was impossible to use words to describe in a normal journal, so that was when she decided to come back to art as a way of expressing. 

This was a good example of a Japanese tradition called Wabi-sabi (侘寂), and since then, that made her works revolve around this concept. The definition of Wabi-Sabi is the acceptance of imperfection and transience, yet still finding beauty in it.

Distinct properties of the of wabi-sabi are: signs of imperfection, asymmetry, simplicity and unrefined roughness.

Discovering Miho Kajioka's work and learning more about the wabi-sabi tradition had enhanced my views on my work and influenced it. I have seen my works as incomplete and many of my works are revolved around working in many steps, and not really leading to one final piece or anything, and I tend to just keep producing art without the intention to bring it to a conclusion. Most of the time, my digital works are from my physical works that could be seen as unfinished, but then I  bring them through a long process of modification and keep finding a new context for it, therefore it is never complete and it is imperfect in every way.

 

Lazika, Georgia, 2013

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Lazika, Georgia, 2013

I was drawn to this piece because of two main things; it's colour and the way it is positioned. Normally, I would see paintings and artwork within The Photographer's Gallery, or most galleries to be placed prestigiously on the wall, mostly at eye-level. However, This piece was placed very low and it required me to bend down to look at it. My initial thoughts were I wanted to know why the artist had chose to put it at this level.

Still Life With Flowers -Dee Ferris

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Dee Ferris

Dee Ferris' Work caught my attention because her works are beautifully captivating, using layers to create this sense of fogginess and distance. Somehow, looking at her work, I can't help but feel this lingering feeling of melancholy, like I am missing something.

I find that her works align with my project and my aims because although the painting seems abstract and it is hard and subjective to tell what object is in the painting, it gives off a very specific feeling to the audience. I think that it is interesting how the choice of colour and blurry, soft strokes of her brushstrokes can connote such sadness.

Neil Raitt

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Phenomenology Of Perception by Maurice Merleau-Ponty

Nancy Rubins DIVERSIFOLIA

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My Visit to the Gagosian- Nancy Rubin's Diversifolia

"Diversifolia" refers to the tropical American tree grown in southern United States, and also refers to a species that possesses a wide range of leaf. Although the exhibition did not include any colours or texture that resembled nature or plant-life but the way that the animals were arranged resembled trees. 

Overall, I really liked the balance of the whole exhibition. This was because although there were many animals that looked distressed and alarmed, they seemed to be arranged in way that balances out the chaos.

Maurizio Anzeri's Clockwise

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Maurizio Anzeri

This room that exhibited Maurizio Anzeri's work seemed very uniform and organised. This was partly because this scale of his works were pretty much similar throughout the whole exhibition. My first impressions on his works were that they were very precise and detailed, and it seemed like he was adding pops of colour to black and white photography. However as I progressed through the room I felt uneasy and the atmosphere of his works seemed to be quite eerie. This could be partly due to the fact that he chose to hi light certain features of the human face such as the eye and the mouth, and once I focus on the eye it somehow turns into something unfamiliar when it is pulled out of context from the whole human face we are known to see. Also, the photographs that he used were black and white and seemed vintage, so everything seemed unknown and unfamiliar.

I was first drawn into his work because I want and intend to use stitching and embroidery in my project and would like to see the extents of what it can produce, so this was an amazing example of how detailed and puzzling the act of sewing and embroidering can be. Overall I thought that this was inspirational for me to come see Anzeri's exhibition.

Josh Faught- My visit to the SAATCHI gallery

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Iconoclasts: ART OUT OF THE MAINSTREAM exhibition

I was finding exhibitions to visit for my new project, and I was intrigued at the title of the new exhibitions at SAATCHI gallery. 

 
Definition of an iconoclast:
  • a person who attacks or criticizes cherished beliefs or institutions.
  • a destroyer of images used in religious worship, in particular:
     
    I was drawn to this word, along with "Art out of the mainstream" 
    I did not know what art in the mainstream would look like, because I found that art is so subjective and you can't really categorize anything nowadays. However I was more intrigued as to what extent are the works "new" or "exciting" to be classified as out of the mainstream. Or, it could simply mean how these works in the exhibitions are not influenced by social movements that are well known about, and are out of context from the subjects of our daily lives in 2018?

Sam Gilliam

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Sam Gilliam

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My visit to PACE london- Sam Gilliam

Sam Gilliam

I had been to this exhibition when I was doing part 2 of the course, however he is one of the first artists that came into my head when I knew what I wanted to do for my final project, and his works are now more relevant to me than ever.

I was particularly interested in Sam Gilliam's work, "May III" and "P.A.C, And Then", also his 3d one which was "After Micro W"

 I found that it stood out to me the most in the whole exhibition. This may be because of the surface he used to paint on, and the technique he used. Although he painted on a canvas but the stretcher's shape has a bit of a difference on it, where it is bevelled. This created a subtle difference but to me it was impactful somehow. Also, the techniques he uses on the canvas to create a cloth like texture drawn my attention to it because it made the piece look delicate.

Although the pieces seem to be abstract, but in my opinion the positions and the way the "cloth looking" textures are arranged gives the painting some kind of dimension and perspective, making it look like a painting of something architectural. This may only be my interpretation, and I don't know if the artist has intended for this effect to happen but I found it really ambiguous.

My Visit to Tate Britain: Marguerite Humeau: Echoes

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Marguitte Humeau's Echoes

Today I went to visit the Tate Britain to see Marguerite Humeau’s Echoes. My first impression even before entering the room was that it had a very eerie and almost inaudible background voice. I couldn’t really tell what the person was saying because it was distorted but once I went into the room the sound track made the whole piece seem even more unfamiliar and alien. In my opinion everything in the exhibition seemed very manmade and artificial, especially having the tubes flowing through every piece in the room. It reminded me of a hospital. However, I must admit that I really enjoyed the colour palette that is chosen and everything was aesthetically pleasing to look at, even though the meaning behind the work wasn’t thrown at us as viewers. I tend to look at work before reading the description to get an overview idea and opinion on it first. After reading the description I realised that it was about life and death and the sculptures took inspiration from sacred animals, and the exhibition focused around poison and cure. The most interesting aspect of the meaning to me was the use of colour. First I thought that pastel tones were used simply because they were so pleasing to look at, but I was surprised to know that such a lovely shade of yellow was used because it was the shade of the venom of the Black Mamba snake.

Joan Miro

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Joan Miro's "Maternité"

Joan Miro has managed to reduce "maternity" and the love of a mother to her child to be as simple as possible. I can just about recognise the female form but if I am being honest, the title has its own purpose to help us identify what is in the painting and without the title it may be harder to recognise what is being portrayed. He strips off all the things that we associate with the human bodies of females and their babies, leaving just the emotional and symbolic aspects behind.

The work, regardless of it's lack of realism, leaning more towards abstraction still manages to convey  a treasured moment in one's lifetime. The precision of his brushstrokes and ability to compose his paintings ables him to reflect the care and preciousness of the act of giving life to another human being.

I personally love the works of Miro, and since the beginning of the project I knew that I wanted to use him as an inspiration because of the sophisticated nature of his paintings. They always make me feel so calm and also reminds me of youth and childhood because I associate his paintings with ceiling mobiles because of the similar shapes

Katy Dove's Lunar

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My visit to White Cube, Pier Paolo Calzolari

Pier Paolo Calzolari's exhibition featured a lot of unique materials and techniques. The piece that stood out the most was the piece that used lead and a candle. It was the first time for me to see an actual flame within an exhibition and that amazed me. This was because there was no real control from the artist on what the outcome of the piece would be like and when and how the candle will be burnt out. Also, the interesting part of the piece was that there was a piece of lead tray on the floor to collect the wax. 

For the artist, his works places a large importance on how materials can be altered and put into a new context. I am interested in this idea because I thought that he conveyed it well. An example of this is when he manages to use worn out and tired looking lead as a main material, but the works still manages to end up looking imperfect, but aesthetic.

My visit to the Stephen Friedman Gallery, Manuel Espinosa's exhibition

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Manuel Espinosa

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My visit to the Stephen Friedman Gallery, Manuel Espinosa's exhibition

This was my second time back at the Stephen Friedman and even though it is a rather small contemporary gallery, it hasn't failed to impress me yet again. The minute I stepped into the gallery I already liked what I was seeing!

Espinosa's works revolves around on creating paintings that are mostly created from geometrical shapes, that are very carefully and strictly in order and uniform. He arranged those geometrical shapes like circles and squares into sequences and patterns to investigate their relations to colour and space, whilst experimenting with depth and movement. I also think that he also controlled transparencies and the opacity of his painting order to generate optical illusions.

Although the paintings looked incredibly simple, they create some kind of optical illusion and plays with our eyes when we look at it, and it was as if the paintings were moving. Although he uses simple shapes and colours to create the painting, the painting looks complex. Looking at his works made me reflect on my own work and how using the same principles could create an entirely different work, because I  think that the artist I had both also used the relationships between colours to create effects. I also admire how precise everything was, almost like the geometrical shapes were not painted by hand but by a machine!

 

My visit to PACE gallery - april

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Pace gallery- Fred Wilson's Afro Kismet exhibition

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Fredrik Akum

Normally, I am a person that is most inspired by artists that I have seen in real life. Therefore, it is why I tend to visit a variety of exhibitions as a "main source of research". However, I have to admit that being inspired as an artist nowadays is easier than ever, with influences from different emerging platforms such as social media and the internet. For me personally, I use my social media as quite a big way of gaining inspiration, and one of the artists that I really admire the works of, I found out through the use of instagram. Fredrik Akum is an artist based in Sweden that does delicate, large scale paintings using acrylic on canvas. I find his works amazing because I wouldn't have thought that he used acrylic for his works because it does include transperancy and layers, quite similar to how I like to work. I would think that he thinned out oil paint for his paintings but it was done through water and acrylic. I admire his calm and neutral tones that he uses along with the huge scale and size of the canvas.

Jarek Puczel

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Samuel Johnson By James Barry

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Spencer Gore by Harold Gilman

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Tacita Dean: Portrait, My visit to the National Portrait Gallery

Today was my first day at the National Portrait Gallery. I have specifically wanted to come here because Emma had suggested for me to come to see Tacita dean's exhibition during my progress tutorial. I have never heard of Tacita Dean, but after reading a bit about her I was very excited to go see this show. Mainly because she was the first to exhibit film as a medium within the National Portrait gallery!

The first room that I entered to watch her films was the room with Merce Cunningham in Merce Cunningham performs STILLNESS. Initially, I was a little surprised and felt like the room overtook me. It was pitch black except three screens that were lit. I particularily was interested by how the screen was hanging down smoothly from the ceiling, creating an illusion that the man was actually in the room. Also hanging from the ceiling somehow gave the work an eerie atmosphere. I really enjoyed this because it was very interesting for me to think about how artists present their own work. For example, in my opinion I think that showing the performance of STILLNESS on a television or watching the clip on the internet would feel like an entirely different clip. This room, and this installation however transforms that piece into something completely new, where it engulfs the viewers and make them feel like they are in a different world from when they were only a few steps back, outside of the room.

Providence (2017), a portrait of David Warner with hummingbird, on the other hand, gave me a very calming feeling when I watched the film play for an extended period of time. This piece in particular gave me a rush of warm and comforting emotions. I don't know how to explain it but the act of just watching the two clips played together was almost meditative. The similarities with my work and hers are that I would like to think that both convey a sort of calming effect. After knowing that the two pieces were played together because David Warner simply adored hummingbirds made me feel warm. I am amazed at how something so simple, when presented in the best way possible, can create such a huge impact.

Throughout the whole exhibition, eventhough theres no sound for most of the videos but I somehow felt like there was. Maybe it was the ambience that the room and the projector created, but if this effect was intentional I really think that it works.

 

 

hach winik by Miquel Dewever-Plana

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Hach Winik by Miquel Dewever-Plana

I purchased this book because it caught my eye instantly even before reading it. The cover of the book was simply so unique, and it looked so precious. When I opened to see what was inside I was amazed. Miquel Dewever-Plana had captured the essence of the people of the Chiapan forest, the Hach Winik in a series of captivating, moody and delicate selection of photographs.

The Hach-Winik are known as the "true men", where there lives are one with nature and have not yet been corrupted by technology and imaginary boundaries and rules. They compose of just over a thousand people trying to preserve their lives to what it is.

The photographs are so captivating, and the warm tones that permeates throughout the series gives me a sense of nostalgia, even though our lives could not be more different and everything is so unknown to me. The people, and the scenery are so unfamiliar to me, yet it gives me this dream-like feeling when going through the book.

Miho Kajioka

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Miho Kajioka: Unfinished Spaces

If I had to describe her works, I would say that they are minimal, yet complete. For instance this image of sheep depicts two small figures of sheep that we can barely recognise, amidst an engulfing space of black. Her photos are very simple yet seem to make us think that it delivers a deeper meaning, and everything seems eerie yet we want to discover more about it. This might be because of the proximity of the focus points she uses within her photos, and how most of them are incomplete beings. For example we can only see the lips of a human, and also in the photograph with the lady wearing a kimono we could not see her face. 

I really liked her work and wanted to research more about her because it aligns with my work and how I intend to produce just fragments instead of whole memories.

Khirdalan, Azerbaijan

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Khirdalan, Azerbaijan

These photographs portray figures that are meant to create an effect of an optical illusion. These are created by the students of the chess school located at Khirdalan Heydar Aliyev Centre, in order to help the younger people develop their abstract thinking skills and spatial imagination. 

I liked the idea behind this because when I saw the pieces I wasn't sure if they were entirely photography or edited/painted in some way because the angles that everything was placed seemed abstract and everything looked so clean and perfected.

My Visit to The photographer's Gallery, Khirdalan, Azerbaijan

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Dee Ferris

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Dee Ferris

Dee Ferris managed to use abstraction to portray a bouquet of flowers in "Still Life With Flowers". Although there is no clear form that suggests there is a bouquet of flowers, we, as audiences can still sense it. This is because of the colour she used and the contrast that it gives. The white is very clear yet blurred at the edges, creating this soft and translucent texture.

To me, it is like the flower is being concealed, but there is no physical wall that conceals it from us, but the way she uses her brushstrokes makes it seem more emotional and how we can't quite remember how the flower looks like because it is in our distant memories.

 

 

Neil Raitt

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Neil Raitt

Neil Raitt effectively uses repetition and the idea of using patterns to create his paintings. I have also noticed that his work mainly surrounds nature and symbols that represents it such as mountains and trees. His paintings are a reinterpretation of landscape painting. In my opinion, he is a landscape artist, however he does not follow the traditional way and uses adapts a more abstract way to mirror real landscapes.

I find his work fascinating because of the pattern and tessellation seems like it was created by a machine, where everything perfectly aligns, similar to how prints are made on textiles, but he managed to create that illusion by using oil paint.

 

nancy Rubins DIVERSIFOLIA

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Nancy Rubin's Drawing, 2018

Everything in the exhibition seemed to have similar properties. I thought that everything was made of some sort of metal, like steel and aluminum, therefore I also assumed that this piece in the corner of the room was of the same type. However, to my surprise, when I read the information about this piece it said "Drawing, 2018, Graphite on rag paper". That amazed me and instantly made me gravitate more towards this piece in order to get a closer look. I found it really puzzling and interesting how graphite could replicate such an iconic texture such as metal.

I always knew that graphite had some sort of shine when used on paper, and from my personal view point I did not appreciate as much, and preferred more matte monochrome tools such as charcoal and soft pastels. This piece of work has shown me how that aspect of a medium that I have seen as undesirable could be used effectively in order to create a whole new effect. The artist has effectively used the qualities of graphite to mimic the shiny surface of metal to transform such a matte and rigid surface such as rag paper.

Makiko Kudo- My visit to the SAATCHI gallery

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Makiko Kudo

This was one of my favourite painters that I have seen face to face. The paintings are so delicate and colourful. Also, immediately, somehow as soon as I saw the paintings I knew that the artist was Japanese. Personally, I admire and follow up on many Japanese artists and there's a particular style that reminds me of that. Not surprisingly, when I went up to look at the name of the artist I found out that she was Japanese. I thought that this fitted with my project very well because of the colours and paint style that the artist has chosen that was very childlike and mild.

Also another interesting aspect that I have slowly realised throughout the entirity of this course is my increase in familiarity with different mediums. This may sound very obvious and straightforward but I have became more aware of what artists use to make their work. For example before I had this many oppurtunities to see artwork at a regular basis in London, I would have seen a painting as a painting and may or may not be able to recognise what the artists have used. However as I observed more and more work along with using more mediums myself I am now able to tell from a glance what the artists have used, and in this case I could tell that she had used oil painting instead of acrylic. This might sound very obvious but it was just a small detail that I have realised recently.

Josh Faught

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Josh Faught

The Professor (Scott) 2014
Hand woven and crocheted hemp and gold lamé (hand dyed in colors to match the 2013/2014 fashion forecast), Indigo, wool, sequin trim, coffee spill (resin), pins, and Scrapbooking

These histories directly intersected in a specific component of the exhibition: woven replicas of portions of the Names Project’s AIDS Memorial Quilt (1987–present), the largest ongoing, community fiber project in the world dedicated to the memorialization of people lost to the AIDS pandemic. Like the film Longtime Companion, the quilt’s sentimentality and its function as a vehicle for grieving was received with skepticism by many AIDS activists, not to mention prominent members of the art world, where the same attributes were, and often continue to be, regarded as hallmarks of non-serious art. As many observers and supporters of the quilt have noted, its aesthetic and emotional power is rooted in the very terms of its dismissal; for instance, its amateurish quality is a form of craft that highlights a human touch and fosters emotional connections to handwork and materials. Faught’s signature style of decoratively dense eccentricity in fiber is similarly charged, and throughout his installation, craft was deployed in the service of a broad investigation of dismissed or suppressed histories, lifestyles, and feelings.

“He is survived by his longtime companion”: Feeling in the Work of Josh Faught

By Elissa Auther http://www.artpractical.com/feature/he-is-survived-by-his-longtime-companion-feeling-in-the-work-of-josh-faught/

Minjung Kim

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Minjung Kim- my visit to her exhibition

This was the second time that I came back to the White cube. I was pleasantly surprised and I'm also confident to say that this was my favourite exhibition in the white cube mason's yard! Upon entering the first room of the gallery, everything seemed very washed out minimal. The exhibition had a very calming and zen ambience around it. Even without knowing that the artist is korean, I could tell that the works were originated from an asian culture because of the familiar delicate nature it has. I was amazed at the detail of the work. Also I liked how each piece changes depending from the proximity in which you are looking at the piece from.

When I entered the lower ground gallery I was surprised again! Although these works were from the same artist and same exhibition with similar techniques, the ambience completely changed. These were much more playful yet maintaining the delicacy. I was captivated by how the artist had used hangi paper to create such playful compositions.

Robert Ryman's interview On Paintings And Pictures

After reflecting on this week's discussion on the Robert Ryman's interview text, I found that it affected my way of working. This is because I've become more aware of the technical aspects of my work rather than focusing on making every action have a deeper meaning. I've learnt that everything counts as the piece of art, including the way it is installed. In my opinion, I think that Robert Ryman's work could be argued as both conceptual and realist. Although he claims to be realism which is partly accurate because he is using paint to recreate white paint, however I think that there is no denying the fact that there are conceptual procedures that he took in the making of the painting, for example thinking about the way the painting is presented and the process of that too. However, in my opinion it is an ongoing debate that will never end because it is very subjective. There isn't a clear line between what is conceptual and what is not.

I just let my mind think less about what I am doing but I made sure that I was constantly doing something instead. I found it a new experience and enjoy creating without thinking but instead experimenting with ways of making. I found that it made me focus less on making my work perfect but instead focusing on developing it further through the use of using many mediums.

On Paintings and pictures, my annotations

My annotations on John Berger's Ways Of Seeing