Collection: Part 2

Research

Tara Donovan

Details

My visit to Pace london- Tara Donovan's COMPOSITIONS

This was also the second time that I came back to the PACE exhibition. Initially, when I entered the room I thought that the canvases that I was seeing were white and blank. Everything seemed very minimal and in order. However once I moved my perspective and focused on only one piece at a time I realised that they were in fact not blank at all, they were quite the opposite. They were a set of work with depth and complexity.

Overall I really enjoyed her works because I can't even imagine how she managed to create such patterns with cards. The pieces hold a lot of architectural aspect to it as well.

 

"The process of making comes after I've figured out what I want the material to do, and what it is that the material is revealing in a phenomenological or perceptual way." Tara Donovan, 2015.

I appreciate how she feels about materials and by giving them importance from the first place it makes her work more impactful.

Minjung Kim

Details

Minjung Kim

Details

My visit to the White cute- Minjung Kim's THE MEMORY OF PROCESS

This was the second time that I came back to the White cube. I was pleasantly surprised and I'm also confident to say that this was my favourite exhibition in the white cube mason's yard! Upon entering the first room of the gallery, everything seemed very washed out minimal. The exhibition had a very calming and zen ambience around it. Even without knowing that the artist is korean, I could tell that the works were originated from an asian culture because of the familiar delicate nature it has. I was amazed at the detail of the work. Also I liked how each piece changes depending from the proximity in which you are looking at the piece from.

When I entered the lower ground gallery I was surprised again! Although these works were from the same artist and same exhibition with similar techniques, the ambience completely changed. These were much more playful yet maintaining the delicacy. I was captivated by how the artist had used hangi paper to create such playful compositions.

Katherina Grosse- my annotations

Anthony Caro

Details

Anthony Caro

Anthony Caro’s Early One morning probably is seen as very different from my work and it may even have more differences than similarities. His work is architectural and 3 dimensional and looks very industrial, while on the other hand my work is very soft and seen as more two dimensional. However, I found that the colour used and the lines that run throughout both of our works are a major part of the pieces as a whole. This showed me how similar designs could be displayed in totally different ways, using different materials and methods as well.

Early One Morning is a major example of the kind of sculpture that established Caro as the leading young sculptor of the 1960s. In this work, his arrangement of planes and lines along a horizontal axis gave greater freedom in creating different rhythms and configurations. The work has no fixed visual identity and no single focus of interest. Rather, it unfolds and expands into the spectator’s space, its appearance changing with the viewpoint. The individual elements are unified by the bright red colour and Caro sees the way they cohere, making a sculptural whole, as being like the relationship of notes within a piece of music.

I found this intriguing and I agree with the part that says it has no fixed visual identity and no single focus of interest. This is because the piece looks like it's been made with something industrial like metal, however the way that he assembles it looks effortless and makes such a sharp and bold material seem so fluid and playful.

 

My Visit to Tate Britain: Marguerite Humeau: Echoes

Details

Echoes

Today I went to visit the Tate Britain to see Marguerite Humeau’s Echoes. My first impression even before entering the room was that it had a very eerie and almost inaudible background voice. I couldn’t really tell what the person was saying because it was distorted but once I went into the room the sound track made the whole piece seem even more unfamiliar and alien. In my opinion everything in the exhibition seemed very manmade and artificial, especially having the tubes flowing through every piece in the room. It reminded me of a hospital. However, I must admit that I really enjoyed the colour palette that is chosen and everything was aesthetically pleasing to look at, even though the meaning behind the work wasn’t thrown at us as viewers. I tend to look at work before reading the description to get an overview idea and opinion on it first. After reading the description I realised that it was about life and death and the sculptures took inspiration from sacred animals, and the exhibition focused around poison and cure. The most interesting aspect of the meaning to me was the use of colour. First I thought that pastel tones were used simply because they were so pleasing to look at, but I was surprised to know that such a lovely shade of yellow was used because it was the shade of the venom of the Black Mamba snake.

The Vertical Plane (Robert Rauschenberg)

Details

The vertical plane (Robert Rauschenberg)

Rauschenberg combines integrated aspects of sculpture and painting to become an entirely new artistic category. The way that his works were composed and laid out challenged the traditional concept of  the picture plane, which results in transforming the viewers into another dimension of reality. 

Personally I was interested in the objects he chose to display as well. This seemed like he juxtaposed ready made objects with objects that he created into this mixture that balances well in my opinion. The process of making the sculpture/painting seems very simple as it just looks like a 3D object is just placed onto a flat plane however the effect is powerful.

Details

Eva hesse

How this artist caught my attention was less because I was intrigued about the physical qualities of her work but more about how I liked the idea behind her work. Specifically when she questions "Where does a painting begin?" and "When does it end?"

Especially during this week when we are to question the meaning of paint, trying to create a painting without actually using the traditional "paint", I found that this way of thinking really helps me to develop my work. Paintings does not have to be on a canvas, hung on a wall or done by paint. It could be anything the artist wants it to be, and by learning this really helped me to gain confidence in creating by using new materials. Even though I enjoy using paint to draw detailed and sophisticated paintings I am also enjoying this new approach.

Details

Eva Hesse

Details

Jessica Stockholder

Details

Jessica Stockholder

She was one of the artists that caught my attention from the presentation because of something as simple as the contrasting colours and shapes she used. They all are geometric in some way and I unconsciously have adapted those geometry into my work because I liked how playful her works turned out to be.

The light on the wall operates in the space of painting, anchored to the paint, flat surfaces, and even illusion of this world. The air that blows through the corridor that is the gallery mixes with tendrils of story telling blowing off the surfaces of pictures hung throughout. Walking down the long path paved with wood grain linoleum, footsteps echo in the stillness of the empty. The frieze running around the edge of the room acts like the curtain of a stage, making the play seem cozy. The event is bracketed by something larger, like God.

To build a block of lego, thinking about a pattern or picture on the face of the block. Tying the picture to the structure on the inside. This interlocking in four directions serving two functions…structure building and picture making. The complexity of possibility that emerges in this task parallels the interlocking relationship between ideas, thoughts, images, and evocations given rise to by the work. Memory, decorating, home decor, picture making, surface, body, movement and skin again.

 

Start of PAINTING AT THE EDGE OF THE WORLD- Specific objects- my annotations

Robert Ryman Interview- my annotations

My Visit to the Stephan Friedman Gallery

My initial thoughts on this set of paintings were that it reminded me of paintings back in Thailand. It was probably because of the use of colour, for example emerald green is commonly used to paint moody paintings. I was drawn to the paintings because of the moody background and it seems that the sky and the sea were some kind of natural disaster, like the beginning of a big storm. However, in some paintings the people within the painting seemed to be enjoying their time/ not afraid of the powerful sea. I found this an interesting contrast and am intrigued to know more about the painting. My initial thoughts on the meaning of the paintings were that they were migrating across the seas, in the more serious looking paintings. However there are some paintings within the set that showed the people looking like they are conversing happily and laughing. This gave me the idea that the artist is trying to show how people that are battling for their lives at sea are human too, having emotions and feelings just like everyone, showing how we should empathise with them.

When it reminded me of paintings back from Thailand, they tend to be traditional paintings. However, the people in these painting seem to be wearing quite recent fashion/clothing so in my opinion there is an interesting juxtaposition between the figures and the background. Although I really like the background and appreciate the immense detail within these paintings I have to admit that I'm not the biggest fan of painting portraits/people using intense colours and making them look photo-realistic. I prefer a more stylised way of painting portraits however I really appreciate the contrast and interesting storyline of the paintings. Also, I feel like these paintings combined many art movements into one. I feel like the background of his works remind me of paintings in the romanticism period however the figures within the paintings look more contemporary. 

 

Details

My Visit to the Stephan Friedman Gallery

Details

My Visit to the Stephan Friedman Gallery

Details

Sam Gilliam

Details

Sam Gilliam

Details

Visit to PACE LONDON

Sam Gilliam

I was particularly interested in Sam Gilliam's work, "May III" and "P.A.C, And Then", also his 3d one which was "After Micro W"

I found that it stood out to me the most in the whole exhibition. This may be because of the surface he used to paint on, and the technique he used. Although he painted on a canvas but the stretcher's shape has a bit of a difference on it, where it is bevelled. This created a subtle difference but to me it was impactful somehow. Also, the techniques he uses on the canvas to create a cloth like texture drawn my attention to it because it made the piece look delicate.

Although the pieces seem to be abstract, but in my opinion the positions and the way the "cloth looking" textures are arranged gives the painting some kind of dimension and perspective, making it look like a painting of something architectural. This may only be my interpretation, and I don't know if the artist has intended for this effect to happen but I found it really ambiguous.

Details

Callum Innes

Innes has probably become best known for his Exposed Paintings series – made by layering pigments onto the canvas and then removing the oil paint with washes of turpentine – though this concern for the processes of painting, and un – painting, is shared by his Agitated Verticals, Resonance, Isolated Forms, and Monologue works. The play between additive and subtractive processes means that the potential for uncertainty is ever present within a rigorous visual language.

Details

Callum Innes

Details

Tomma Abts

Tomma Abts makes complex paintings on paper and focuses on the process of creation instead of making meaning out of everything. She begins each work without any preconceived composition or idea on what she's about to paint. The paintings are made possible by intuition, however, in my opinion the paintings come out looking like the exact opposite, because they seem so precise and well thought out. While abstract, the works are still illusionistic, with focus on shadows. The work has a three-dimensional effect along with the use of a realistic light source.

I was more intrigued by the method of creating these paintings more than how it looks. To me, they look appealing, however at first glance I did not think these were "abstract" paintings. So, after reading about Tomma Abt's work it inspired me to create a piece of abstract work that placed more weight on to intuitive working and less focus on the meaning on this week's project.

 

 

Details

Tomma Abts

Details

Toba Khedoori

On the day of the crit, when I have already finished all of my paintings I came across this artist through one of my peers. I was instantly drawn to it because it has similarities with my work, however there is no doubt that they are different in many ways too. I found out that her work was actually created by oil paint, and I would never have guessed that because it looked so much like watercolour or a monochrome medium like charcoal. It was interesting to see how she had used such a rich medium like oil paint to create something that appeared very thin. 

Toby Khedoori's paintings portrays her attention to detail and her appreciation for the beauty of nature and everyday life. It is in a way, a message to us to take appreciate our surroundings and what we have been given.

 

Details

Toba Khedoori

Details

My annotations- After Medium Specificity

Chuck Close

Details

Chuck Close

Chuck Close creates photo-realistic portrait paintings of people that seem to be very realistic and detailed. However, once you look closer the painting is actually created by small individual paintings within grids. Each and every grid could even be a painting in itself, but they are combined together to create shade and shadow that resembles a face.

Overall I find this technique of painting unique as I don't see any other artist doing this and it is striking to me, therefore I will remember this artist's work. I think that it is an effective use of technique, partly because of the large scales of the paintings too.

Details

Gerhard Richter

Details

Gerhard Richter

Gerhard Richter created a series of paintings that resembled a photograph. However, he did not have the intention to imitate a photograph, but he believed the act he was doing was "producing photographs".

I liked his work the moment I knew they weren't photographs, I found that impressive how he can recreate the qualities of photographs by using a paintbrush. Also, the idea behind his work is very unique. Normally, we are used to working on a painting from photographs, as a reference. However, this is the other way round, using paint to recreate a photograph. The idea alone inspires me to investigate with paint to create different effects.

Details

Instant Stories- Wim Wender's

Details

The Photographer's Gallery

"Instant Stories"- Wim Wenders' Polaroids

This exhibition caught my eye and it is definitely one of the exhibitions that I really enjoy because it is both visually pleasing and also evokes my thoughts. It is a large collection of the film-maker Wim Wenders' polaroids. Although I'm not quite sure if I have seen his movies but now I am even more interested in seeing them after seeing his impressive collection. What intrigues me the most is 

"The camera itself is considered a toy, not a 'serious' instrument, and taking pictures with it is simply fun."

Just by changing the type of instrument we use to capture a moment in time gives off a whole new meaning to the work an changes the perspective of both the viewers and the photographer as well. To me, the polaroids also feel playful and carefree, like they were on a road trip to somewhere where they could do anything they wanted. Also, polaroids connote memory and having a collection of memories could mean that each snapshot means something to the photographer.

Details

WAYS OF SEEING my annotations

start of INTERROGATING THE REAL - Social Realism

Social Realism 

I learnt that Social realism is an art movement that can be represented through many media from painting to photography. It focuses on the everyday lifestyle of people lower in the social hierarchy, such as the working class and the poor, and critiques the social structure in the society. 

During the 1930s when there was the great depression and the rise of Fascism in Europe, resulted in American artists turning away from abstract art and to adopt realistic styles of painting. As a result, there were a lot of idealised, overly exaggerated and patriotic displays of America's past. That was when Social Realists felt the need for change, adapting to an art movement that is more socially relevant.

Social Realism was created “To criticize all the monstrosities of our vile society”- Ilya Repin

After researching about this movement I grew interest in this "category" of realism because it seemed to contrast the norms back in the days. It was more common to find art in a museum, where every piece is prized and almost worshipped, and detailed paintings and portraits were only made for the rich, as a symbol of wealth and accomplishment.

Grant Wood's "American Gothic" depicts social realism because it is a painting of a working class couple, not something that people would see in portraits back in the time period. It was not idealised and everything in the painting depicted what some people were really like.

 

Details

American Gothic

Details

Comments


    Add comment

    Fields marked by '*' are required.